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Education Series: Racism in America – The History We Didn’t Learn in School

April 18, 2023 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.

Tuesday evenings:
April 18 and 25; May 2, 9, 16 and 23 (2023)
7 p.m. on Zoom

We read and hear a great deal these days about controversies surrounding the teaching of American history from a broader perspective than most of us have experienced. Objections to teaching this history appear to be based on a vague awareness that the information is troubling. Yet, what do we really know about these events in our past and the ways in which they inform today’s society?

As citizens, as parents and grandparents, whose families may be impacted by state/local government and school board decision-making, as people of faith, it is incumbent on us to educate ourselves with facts rather than innuendo.

In bringing to light this history of ours, which we should have known but didn’t, we may be transformed in deeply meaningful ways, with a desire to engage in honest dialogue with one another, with a new or a renewed urgency to take action — to finally and truly address the profound inequities that exist in our society today.

REGISTER NOW

 

Sponsored by:

   

 

 

 

This important series has been offered through the Episcopal Church in Delaware; YWCA Delaware; Osher Institutes of Lifelong Learning at the Universities of Delaware and Michigan; Quest for Learning in Lancaster, Pa.; Willow Valley and Heron Point retirement communities; Concord and First & Central Presbyterian Churches; St. Phillips Lutheran Church; and The Episcopal Church of Saints Andrew & Matthew.


See Work for Justice + Peace for more opportunities.